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Platanus (Planetree) x. acerifolia 'Morton Circle' (Exclamation London Planetree)

Selected for its uniform, upright-pyramidal habit: conical in its youth. A strong central leader and attractive foliage. Densely branched with attractive brown, green and tan exfoliating bark. Shows resistance to frost cracking. Moderate growth rate. Grows best in full sun with good air circulation. Excellent tolerance for urban conditions.

  • Height: 55'-60'
  • Spread: 40'-45'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Quercus (Oak) bicolor (Swamp White Oak)

A beautiful native tree with lustrous heavy textured green leaves. Stiffly pyramidal form in youth, becoming a broad open, rounded crown with age. Yellow to red-purple Fall color. Long lived. Range of soil types, including damp sites. Not tolerant of salt or air pollution. Long lived. Easy to transplant.

  • Height: 50'-60'
  • Spread: 50'-60'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Quercus (Oak) coccinea (Scarlet Oak)

Native to southeastern Missouri. A large tree with a rounded, open habit. Long, deeply-cut, glossy-green leaves that turn scarlet in Fall. Acorn fruit. A stately tree for the lawn, particularly in drier locations, with excellent Fall color. Also good street tree. Ensure it is located in a location that will allow it sufficient space to grow up and spread.

  • Height: 50'-70'
  • Spread: 40'-50'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Quercus (Oak) ellipsoidalis (Northern Pin Oak)

Also known as Hill’s Oak, Yellow Oak, and jack Oak. Native to northern Midwest United States. Similar to the Red oak but does not get as large and is heavier-branched. Simple, sharp-lobed leaves turn reddish in the Fall. Intolerant of shade. Prefers dry, acid, sandy soil, but tolerates heavier soils. Yellow inner bark.

  • Height: 50'-75'
  • Spread: 40'-60'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Quercus (Oak) imbricaria (Shingle Oak)

A deciduous oak of the Red Oak group. Begins with a conical form that matures to a broad and rounded crown. Brownish-gray bark. Native tree. Yellowish-green flowers as the leaves emerge. Variable Fall color ranging from yellow to red-brown. Persistent leaves. Rounded acorns. A low maintenance tree with good pest resistance.

  • Height: 40'-60'
  • Spread: 40'-60'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics Out of Stock

Quercus (Oak) macrocarpa (Bur Oak)

Native tree for prairies and oak savannahs. Bold, foliage. More tolerant of city conditions than most oaks. Corky bark of great Winter interest.

  • Height: 60'-80'
  • Spread: 60'-80'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Quercus (Oak) palustris (Pin Oak)

A deciduous oak of the Red Oak group. Broad pyramidal crown. Smooth, brown-gray bark. Primarily native to Midwest and mid-Atlantic states. Yellowish-green flowers as the leaves emerge in Spring. Rounded acorns. Glossy dark-green leaves turn deep red in Fall. Excellent as a street and landscape tree.

  • Height: 50'-70'
  • Spread: 40'-60'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics Out of Stock

Quercus (Oak) Quercus muehlenbergii (Chinkapin Oak)

With its strong branches and interesting leaves, the chinkapin oak makes a beautiful statement. This conversation piece of a tree is worthy of a prominent place in any larger lawn, estate or park. The magnificent oak also adds to the ambiance by drawing a variety of wildlife with its acorns. In fact, chinkapin acorns are the food of choice for many animals.

 

  • Height: 40-60'
  • Spread: 50-70'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Quercus (Oak) robur 'Long' (Regal Prince Oak)

A columnar to narrow-oval cultivar that is the result of a cross between Q. robur ‘Fastigiata’ and Q. bicolor. Glossy, leathery, dark green foliage with soft, light underside. Excellent resistance to powdery mildew. Excellent winter hardiness with resistance to wind and ice. Yellow-brown Fall color. Excellent as a specimen, in small groups or as a tall screen. Oval to elliptic acorn fruit.

  • Height: 40'-60'
  • Spread: 20'-25'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Quercus (Oak) robur x. Q. alba 'Cimschmidt' (Crimson Spire Oak)

A hybrid of Q. alba and Q. robur producing the best characteristics of both. A fast growing, hardy, tightly columnar tree that fits perfectly into streetscape and landscape settings. Dark-green, mildew resistant foliage and red Fall color. Dense foliage makes for excellent living screens. Easy to grow.

  • Height: 40'-45'
  • Spread: 15'-20'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics Out of Stock

Quercus (Oak) rubra (Red Oak)

Rounded, pyramidal native tree. Upright spreading branches. Fast growing oak suitable for lawns, parks, and commercial sites. Transplants better than most Oaks and is pH tolerant. Prefers acidic conditions. Excellent red Fall color.

  • Height: 40'-50'
  • Spread: 40'-45'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Quercus (Oak) shumardii (Shumard Oak)

Dark green, leather leaves turn orange to red in Fall. Rapid growth rate. Pyramidal habit when young, becoming oval-rounded to rounded with age. Drought and urban tolerant, with adaptable pH. Excellent for use as a shade tree in large areas, or as a specimen tree. Long lived.

  • Height: 60'-80'
  • Spread: 40'-50'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics Out of Stock

Taxodium (Baldcypress) distichum (Common Baldcypress)

Native tree. Good as a street tree. Drought tolerant. Generally found in wet swampy areas, often in standing water. A deciduous conifer. Pyramidal to conical shape, especially when young. Branching is more or less horizontal. Foliage emerges as a bright yellow and matures to a soft green. Needles turn an attractive, warm reddish brown in fall. Relatively care-free. Works well at pond edges, for shade, in wet sites, as well as in groupings.

  • Height: 50'-80'
  • Spread: 20'-30'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Ulmus (Elm) americana 'Princeton' (Princeton American Elm)

Vase shaped, upright symmetrical habit.  Dark green foliage turns yellow in fall.  Great resistance to Dutch Elm Disease makes this a great street tree or in the lawn.  Tolerates urban conditions, including wet or dry sites, and air pollution.

  • Height: 50' - 70'
  • Spread: 30' - 50'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Ulmus (Elm) Ulmus alata (Winged Elm)

The winged elm gets its name from the very broad, warty growths, thin and wing-like, that grow along its branches. The “wings” are irregular and sometimes look more like knots than wings.
Its branches form a vase shape with an open, rounded crown. The leaves of the winged elm are small and oval, a dark green color with paler, hairy undersides. Flowers are brown or burgundy and appear before the leaves in March or April. They produce the fruit, a very short orange samara that disperses by the end of April.

  • Height: 30'-50'
  • Spread: 25'-40
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Ulmus (Elm) x 'Morton Glossy' (Triumph™ Elm)

Strong, upright branching with oval habit. Produced through the Chicagoland Grows program. Fast growth rate, up to 3′ per year. Disease and pest resistant to Dutch Elm Disease, elm yellows and elm leaf beetle. An excellent shade tree for home and commercial landscapes. Large, lustrous, dark green foliage turns yellow in Fall.

  • Height: 40'-50'
  • Spread: 40'-45'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Ulmus (Elm) x. 'Frontier' (Frontier Elm)

Exhibits a high level of tolerance to Dutch Elm Disease and moderate resistance to Elm leaf beetle. Upright, pyramidal, symmetrical shape. Lovely red-purple Fall coloration. Perfect for use in smaller landscapes, along city streets and under power lines. Tolerant of urban conditions. Flowers are rarely seen and does not produce seed.

  • Height: 20'-25'
  • Spread: 10'-15'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics

Ulmus (Elm) x. 'Morton' (Accolade® Elm)

Very tolerant to Dutch Elm Disease and Phloem Necrosis, as well as Elm leaf beetle. Vase-shaped tree with arching limbs. Selected and tested at Morton Arboretum. Glossy dark green foliage changing to yellow in the Fall. Vigorous growth rate. Excellent drought tolerance.

  • Height: 60'-70'
  • Spread: 40'-50'
  • Exposure:
Characteristics Out of Stock
Characteristics
  • Attracts Birds
  •  
    Rabbit Resistant
  • Attracts Butterflies
  • Attracts Hummingbirds
  • Deer Resistant
  • Fragrant
  • Salt Tolerant
  • Shade
  • Wet Soils